January 2017

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an independent agency under the WHO, released a report not too long ago that identified processed and red meat as carcinogens. Specifically, researchers have found that high consumption of processed/red meat correlates with increased incidence of colorectal cancer. Before you put down your bacon and hot dogs for good, let us … Read More

A new nasal cell study by Dr. Sabra Klein and her team from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, discovered that various forms of estrogen reduced the flu virus in women, but not in men. Klein and her team tested the effects of estrogen on the influenza A virus, which commonly affects many during flu season. … Read More

The practice of medicine is full of ethical issues and challenges. How should a medical professional respond when he encounters ethical breaches by his own colleagues? In a survey performed by six Pennsylvania Medical Schools, 98% of third and fourth year medical students report hearing physicians refer to their patients in a derogatory manner, and … Read More

Every year, fresh faces entering medical school partake in the centuries-old rite of passage of dissecting human flesh. It is a tradition that, to some, marks the beginning of their life in healthcare, and to others, the point from which medical desensitization starts to take hold. On her first day of gross anatomy, Shara Yurkiewicz, a first-year medical … Read More

There’s something dangerous lurking in that cookie—something potentially more dangerous than the seven grams of fat or four grams of sugar. Researchers at the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences recently found that pathogens like salmonella can survive for six months in cookies and crackers. Embed from Getty Images  Certain kinds of … Read More

Let’s get down to business! You clicked on this article because you didn’t know that seaweed was such a healthy food option. Or maybe you do know it’s good for you, but you’re not sure exactly what benefits it could possibly offer for our bodies. Whichever the case, you’re about to find out why. The main thing … Read More

For those who choose to participate, it is a way of life, and for those who don’t, it appears to be a mere distraction. In either case, one cannot deny the powerful and alluring force that is social media and its effect on everyday life. Why? There must be something more profound to social media than flashy filters and celebrity tweets. … Read More

What’s Lyme disease, you say? If you’re like me, the first thought that probably comes to mind is a disease you contract from eating limes. If you believe that, your brain may truly be turning sour. But all jokes aside, Lyme disease can be serious if left untreated. Lyme disease is caused by a species of bacteria called Borrelia … Read More

Some people grow up or live in the same neighborhoods for decades, greeting the same faces and passing through familiar streets. For many in abandoned neighborhoods, that familiar location and the social network are what make it home, despite the lack of resources and poor living conditions. Gentrification disrupts that sense of community and becomes a … Read More

Many who exercise outdoors prefer to do so for the fresh air, but in areas with high air pollution, many worry that that quality of air and exercise can be an unhealthy combination. Recent studies have demonstrated evidence that the long-term benefits of exercise outweighs the potentials risks of exercising in polluted areas. Air pollution is a … Read More

Twenty five years ago, AquaBounty, a biotechnology company aiming to improve aquaculture productivity and sustainability, created a genetically modified Atlantic salmon that is now in the process for approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be the first genetically modified meat for human consumption to hit the markets…and it might not even be labeled as “genetically … Read More

On June 30, 2015, Bill SB277, which limits people’s ability to opt out of vaccines, was approved and signed into state law by California Governor Jerry Brown. In response to the large measles outbreak in December, a situation linked to low immunization rates, the law requires mandatory vaccinations for children prior to starting school and prevents … Read More

Appendicitis. It’s a diagnosis familiar to many, often heard after a loved one becomes hospitalized. Less common, however, is an understanding of what this condition—and the region of the body it affects—truly entails. Appendicitis is fairly common, affecting roughly one in 15 Americans at some point in their lives. It stems from inflammation of the … Read More

In recent decades, California has made efforts to reduce emissions succeeding in partial smog reduction. Even the annual report from the California Air Pollution Control Officers Association indicated long-term trends of air quality improvement. However, the current drought in California has presented itself as a challenge to those efforts. In a report from the American Lung Association, which evaluated … Read More

As technology advances, we tend to find ourselves frequently buying and accumulating more and more electronics, even when we don’t really need them. Now the question is, what do you usually do with your old devices when you can’t sell them or trade them in? Electronic waste, commonly known as e-waste, is any “electronic or … Read More

Onions may be famous for giving you bad breath and bringing tears to your eyes, but they carry some pretty hefty nutritional value too! While providing abundant flavor to your favorite dishes, they are high in vitamin C, a good source of fiber, and possible players in preventing cancer and reducing the risk of heart disease. Embed … Read More

Marijuana often evokes images of euphoria and relaxed lethargy. Some of the earliest human cultures ingested and smoked the leaves of the plant, and its consumption has persisted in modern society. Although it’s most commonly used as a recreational drug, marijuana also has important medicinal, religious, and spiritual applications. To some, it’s an important clinical substance that functions as … Read More

As medical technology has advanced, contact lenses have become an increasingly popular alternative to glasses. Contacts are often worn to correct myopia (nearsightedness) or hyperopia (farsightedness), but they can correct for other eye conditions as well. For example, specialized multifocal contact lenses are designed for older people with presbyopia. Presbyopia is a very common eye … Read More

We’ve all been in this situation: it’s a busy day, we’ve been sitting in front of the computer screen for a few hours, and we’re beginning to get restless. Eventually, all that pent up energy starts being released, little by little—we begin to move around in our chair, perhaps tapping our fingers, or wiggling our … Read More

With baseball season now in full swing from April to October, the injury “baseball finger,” or more formally known as mallet finger, is now as relevant as ever. “Baseball finger” originates from the injury caused when an object, like a baseball, awkwardly hits the tip of a finger and bends it back beyond its natural limit. However, this … Read More

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